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  • Volume 5 | Words and Photographs: Imaginative Literature and the Making of The Calumet Region: An American Place: Photographs by Gary Cialdella

    It’s a Sunday morning in the late summer of 2002. I’m sitting in the Kennedy Cafe, on Kennedy Avenue in Hammond, Indiana, looking out the window, sipping coffee and waiting for the waitress to bring my breakfast. Two days earlier, I drove in from my home in Kalamazoo, Michigan, on one of many excursions to photograph in the Calumet Region. In 1986, I began photographing this part of the Midwest. Years of photographing culminated in 2009 with the publication of The Calumet Region: An American Place. When I was growing up in the Region, it was one of this country’s largest and most prosperous industrial centers, encompassing the southern portion of Chicago and Cook County, Illinois and neighboring Lake and Porter Counties in Indiana. By the time I began photographing the area, it was already sinking into its long decline. When I left for college in the 1960s, I could not imagine the changes to come, nor the hold this place would have on me.

    http://southshorejournal.org/index.php/component/content/article/91-journals/vol-5-2013/131-words-and-photographs-imaginative-literature-and-the-making-of-the-calumet-region-an-american-place-photographs-by-gary-cialdella

  • Volume 5 | Minding the Realm: William Least Heat-Moon and the Blue Highways of Public Memory

    William Least Heat-Moon, whose ancestors included Englishmen, Irish, and Osage tribesmen, went on a vision quest in 1978. He traveled the back roads of America, so called the “blue highways” because they were marked in blue rather than black or red on the roadmaps of the 1970s. Traveling when gas cost $.65 a gallon, his journey took him on a nearly 14,000-mile loop around the United States. Having lost his teaching position at Stephens College in Missouri, and on the brink of losing his marriage, Least Heat-Moon believed he had reached the nadir of his professional and personal life. With Walt Whitman and Black Elk as his literary, intellectual, and spiritual companions, Least Heat-Moon sojourned forth from Columbia, Missouri. His journey, which took him in and out of the lives of hundreds of his countrymen and women, culminated in the 1982 publication, Blue Highways: A Journey into America.[1]

    http://southshorejournal.org/index.php/component/content/article/91-journals/vol-5-2013/143-minding-the-realm-william-least-heat-moon-and-the-blue-highways-of-public-memory

  • Volume 4 | Marktown: Clayton Mark’s Planned Worker Community in Northwest Indiana

    Marktown is an urban planned worker community in East Chicago, Indiana, built in 1917 from marshland to provide a complete community for workers at The Mark Manufacturing Company. In the construction of Marktown there was an emphasis on tasteful housing in a humane environment (Shaw, 2002). The industries in East Chicago have since expanded to the borders of Marktown, so that today Marktown is a historic residential island surrounded by one of the densest industrial complexes in the world (Shaw, 2002). This self-contained community has a unique characteristic as noted in Ripley’s Believe It or Not (1967), the streets serve as walkways, and the cars are parked on the sidewalks (Taylor, Stevens, Ponder, & Brockman, 1989).

    http://www.southshorejournal.org/index.php/issues/volume-4-2011/82-marktown-clayton-marks-planned-worker-community-in-northwest-indiana

  • Volume 4 | Alice Gray, Dorothy Buell, and Naomi Svihla: Preservationists of Ogden Dunes

    The present article describes the contributions of threepreservationists – Alice Mabel Gray, Dorothy Richardson Buell, andNaomi Ireland Svihla. Each of these women resided in Ogden Dunesat some point in their lives, loved the natural beauty of the area, andcontributed to the preservation of the sand dunes of NorthwestIndiana. Alice Gray did so by bringing attention to the Dunes at atime when critical efforts were being made to preserve them as part of the Indiana Dunes State Park. Dorothy Buell founded the Save the Dunes Council that successfully preserved parts of the dunes in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, and Naomi Svihla added her efforts to the Save the Dunes Council in forming the National Lakeshore.

    http://www.southshorejournal.org/index.php/issues/volume-1-2006/78-journals/vol-1-2006/117-alice-gray-dorothy-buell-and-naomi-svihla-preservationists-of-ogden-dunes

  • About the South Shore Journal

    The South Shore Journal is an open access peer reviewed general on-line journal. The Journal is co-sponsored by One Region and the IU NorthwestCenter for Urban and Regional Excellence. This journal provides a South Shore venue for area scholars to focus their attention and academic resources on the region and allows the editors of the journal the ability to showcase the outstanding scholarly work of faculty, students and alumni in Northwest Indiana.

    http://www.southshorejournal.org/index.php/about-us

About Us

The South Shore Journal is an open access peer reviewed general on-line journal. The Journal is co-sponsored by One Region and the IU Northwest Center for Urban and Regional Excellence. This journal provides a South Shore venue for area scholars to focus their attention and academic resources on the region and allows the editors of the journal the ability to showcase the outstanding scholarly work of faculty, students and alumni in Northwest Indiana.
 
The scholarly and creative work published will ideally represent a broad range of academic disciplines, and be inspired by the One Region quality of life indicators that include: a diverse community where residents are treated with equity and dignity, an economically thriving region, a region of opportunity, a region in balance with its' environment, a region that facilitates learning and intellectual growth, a healthy community, a region of open neighborhoods, an accessible community, a safe community, a region that appreciates the arts and celebrates life, and a community of engaged and caring citizens.
 
Each issue of The South Shore Journal will be a Symposium-style publication with a specific theme selected by the Editorial Board. Each issue will have a different Editor as a result. Please see the Call for Papers for the current theme.
 

Sponsors

The South Shore Journal is sponsored by One Region and IU Northwest Center for Urban and Regional Excellence.

Contact Information

Phone : 219-980-6978
Fax : 219-981-5677
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